Hollywood Liquefier Blender

Hollywood Liquefier
Hollywood Liquefier Blender
Machine Age Blender
Streamline Design Blender
Liquefier Blender
Hollywood Blender
Hollywood Liquefier Detail
Hollywood Liquefier Blender Label
Hollywood Liquefier
Hollywood Liquefier Blender
Machine Age Blender
Streamline Design Blender
Liquefier Blender
Hollywood Blender
Hollywood Liquefier Detail
Hollywood Liquefier Blender Label
sale

Hollywood Liquefier Blender

925.00 1,075.00

Designer: Donald E. Grove (dates unknown) and Jackson D. Comstock (1890 – 1973)

ItemHollywood Liquefier Blender Model No. 48

Manufactured by: Hollywood Liquefier Company 

Country of origin: United States

Year made: 1942

Materials: Bakelite, plastic, steel and rubber

Dimensions: 14 ½” x 8 ¾” x 5” 

Description:  This rare object was designed in 1941 and patented in 1942 and is a masterpiece of machine age streamlined design.  Although blenders were first introduced by the Waring Corporation in 1937, the Hollywood Liquefier is a superior design to anything that came before it and arguably anything after.  The design harkens to a nautical or boat inspired look.  This example is from the first issue and subsequent versions were made that had several changes made to it, such as colors and size off the container.  

Examples are in the collections of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, and The Norwest Collection. The book American Streamlined Design: The World of Tomorrow devotes an entire page and a half to this object.  However, they attribute the maker to Machine Craft Manufacturing Co., but we have been unable to figure out this discrepancy.  

Condition: Very Good.  The base and container are in excellent condition for their age and use.  However, the lid does not fit perfectly either due to shrinkage of the plastic container or it may be a replacement from a slightly later version.  The later versions of this blender appear to be more squat.  The lid also has a repair to one wing where a prior owner sloppily reglued it and we did not believe it prudent to try to correct that.  The rubber cord is also fraying where it meets the base, but this is not an object to be used so it is not an issue.  Regardless of these issues this object is a very rare survivor and worthy of any important Machine Age or Streamlined design collection and is priced accordingly.

References: Hanks, David A., Hoy, Anne, American Streamlined Design: The World of Tomorrow, Flammarion, 2005.

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